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Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)
's lay them out. we start with the storm surge. in irene at battery park which is where i am tonight, we had three to six feet. we're expecting four to eight feet with this storm here and down the jersey shore as well. that will be higher than what they dealt with during irene. so plan on similar scenarios there. then look at the rainfall. huge areas of two inches plus, four inches plus. locally ten inches in spots in parts of new jersey and the chesapeake bay. if you remember the state of new jersey was one of those heavily fladed flooded back here with irene. then snowfall. to add insult to injury, west virginia, ohio, maryland, pennsylvania and parts of virginia could get 50 inches of snow with this. add all these ingredients together, that means power outages, some which will last for weeks. pennsylvania, new york, west virginia, an 800-mile-wide damage path with this. on the 108th anniversary of the opening of the subway system in new york, we're hoping that in 48 hours parts of it won't be under water. >> places are holding their breath tonight. jim cantore in lower manhattan for u
will likely exceed the $12 billion to $16 billion from hurricane irene which battered the northeast in august of 2011 says a chief economist. and an economics professor at smith ity of maryland school of business estimates it will result in about $35 billion to $45 billion total losses. and another company projects $10 billion to $20 billion of damage about half insured. property damage will be repaired and lost economic output will be adjust set by other increased activity as residents prepare for the hurricane. and here is another story about economic impact from "wall street journal." losses may exceed those of the 2011 storm. airlines and shippers expect an extended disruption. will cost them millions of dollars and leave thousands of fliers and goods stranded. airlines will cancel a total more than 14,600 flights as monday and more than the roughly 10,000 canceled due to hurricane irene in 2011. irene comes united continental holdings about $40 million in revenue. delta airlines said hurricane irene forced it to cancel about 2,200 flights costing $15 million in profits. delta has cancele
island instead of bussing people off the island as they did last year during irene. and that's why we have a situation. let's walk over here and show you what the rest o of atlantic city is dealing with. this is an access ramp that takes you up to the boardwalk. so these are the streets of atlantic city down here. this is what it looks like. several feet of water covering the street. and here's where things became a problem. you have 400 people on the other side of the city who decided to ride out the storm and stay in their homes and as we talked earlier today, flood water was coming into those homes and there was no way for local emergency crews to get to them. so they had to mobilize national guard units to get those people out of their homes. things got so dangerous they had to pull the personnel back. so there were a couple hundred people still in their homes on the bay side of the city. the governor said it's a situation they will have to monitor and first thing in the morning at first light respond to and try to get those people out. not far from here just a couple blocks, one
irene making it the fourth costly experienced? >> this is will be worse. three storms. we've never seen anything like this. it's definitely going to be devastating. >> gregg: i was reading forbes, i wish we could put it on o up the scream. beside for potential life and safety, economists are predicting that it will upwards of $55 billion in economic damage? >> yeah, it's hard to tell. we don't really know how it'sng. estimates are all over the place. there is one positive. sectors that desperately need more work, construction workers, electricians, plumbers all the rest, they will be finding more work. so there is some stimulus there, but again it's mainly to the negative. >> gregg: if you are contractor out there, this maybe the silver lining. the other thing, we have seen in past disasters that it dramatically affects unemployment and g.d.p. because those are tied together? >> absolutely. people won't be going to work. as you said, retailers won't be selling, there won't be tax revenues. and g.d.p. measures how much we produce. if we are not producing that much, with that many people
. irene was lots of water. we had extensive flooding. we don't expect anything near than that. this is serious storm. it will on us for a long time, three days or so with gale force or better winds. >> reporter: that was an emergency official we spoke with earlier. one issue i wanted to bring to your attention. water is coming up. beach is coming close to the sand dunes and ten miles there was a $37 million beach restoration program. a lost those homes are protected because of that new beach restoration which did hold up with hurricane irene. they have a lot of faith to keep their homes safe. people in those low-lying areas can expect extreme flooding. there were no mandatory evacuations in this area. so people who did leave left on their own accord. >> jamie: always good to take the safe route. elizabeth, i know you will be riding out the storm. keep us posted. thank you. >> gregg: brand-new report out shows the economy is growing, but, you know what, if you dig deeper, it's not good news at all. why some experts are saying there is a lot more behind those numbers. >> jamie:
, connecticut, long island, new jersey, than irene did last year. this could be a big storm as it makes that turn and slams directly into where new york and new jersey come together, the water could really pile up in here. maybe that problem we thought about last time where water's in the subway, if it gets to be right in new york harbor, we're talking about that scenario potential again. >> chad, we'll keep watching. thanks. >>> a lot more we're following. isha is here with the bulletin. >>> a new york city police officer accused of plotting to kidnap, rape, kill, cook and cannibalize as many as 100 women is being held without bail. the 28-year-old officer is accused of illegally accessing a national crime database to locate potential targets. he did not enter a plea in court today. >>> lee boyd malveaux told the "today" show he was sexually abused by john alan mohammed, the master will did mind mind o attacks that terrorized the washington area in 2002, saying he knew it was wrong but didn't have the willpower to say no. he was 17 at the time of the attacks and he was 15 when his acco
irene did last year. this could be a big storm as it makes that turn and slams directly into where new york and new jersey come together, the water could really pile up in here. maybe that problem we thought about last time where water's in the subway, if it gets to be right in new york harbor, we're talking about that scenario potential again. >> chad, we'll keep watching. thanks. >>> a lot more we're following. isha is here with the bulletin. >>> a late breaking story. a top romney surrogate tonight 50 tributing colin powell's endorsement of president obama to race. here is what john sununu said moments ago on "piers morgan tonight." >> frankly, when you take a look at colin powell, you have to wonder whether that's an endorsement based on issues or whether he has a slightly different reason for preferring president obama. >> what reason would that be? >> well, when you have somebody of your own race that you're proud of for being of your own race, i applaud colin powell for doing so. >>> there wasn't enough real time information to determine exactly what was happening in benghazi, l
we saw with hurricane irene. interior sections for northern vermont and those things probably not as bad. coastal areas absolutely. here is a look at this storm right now doesn't look all that impressive. it looks big. you talk about this being a nor'easter. it's pulling all of this tropical moisture. storms hold a lot more moisture. you can have that much moisture ringing out into a nor'easter. that's why the rain is going to be so significant and going to be a very windy storm. rain already into florida. and we have had that there for 36 hours now. tonight moves in across parts of the carolinas. gets worse. the track does typically does. the start it moves off towards the northeast. then it cuts back toward the west. this is where it gets very interesting. don't pay that much attention to this. this category one hurricane. it's not going to be a typical hurricane and it's going to be strengthening as it makes landfall. we're going to be talking about major problems here. look at one of these models. anywhere you see the green and the blue, that's heavy rain. that's from main
year, when irene came through here, and at some point, on the island, the bay actually touched the atlantic ocean. now, also reminiscent is what's going on in new york city, and that's that the mass transit has been shut down and we're talking the subways. the buses and the trains there. 5 million people go through their daily, so, really crippling that area, and you saw new york city mayor michael bloom berg and he's saying that the 1.1 million kids and city schools will not be going to class tomorrow. however, the new york stock exchange will be open, harris. >> harris: they're going to run on generators we understand and have electronic voting down on the new york stock exchange and anna kooiman, thank you very much. we're getting your images of the behemoth storm, and this is your point of view. patty shea snapped photos at rudy's inlet at virginia beach. wow. paul blare sending this photo of his brother ben pelted by rain and high winds in virginia bridge. and david d'amico from long port, new jersey, as it's coming up from that area, south of new york. and massive waves c
this. we got banged up very badly a year ago with irene. much worse than other states. six weeks later, we had a winter storm that wiped us out. we had 1.1 customers without power in our state. tonight we have over 600,000 people without power. some of our towns were affected by all three of those events and some towns had 97% people without power each and every time in the last year. we're getting used to this right now. we're actually becoming experts at it. >> in terms of the frequency of extreme weather, we have seen governor cuomo talking about that as the new normal. climate change is such a politicized things, but if we're seeing frequent instances of things that are not supposed to happen but once in a century, what do you have to do differently in terms of infrastructure you wouldn't have to do if you weren't facing these events? >> number one, i have been talking about climate change since 1997. it's happened. it's alive and well in connecticut. number two, we have to raise a lot of infrastructure. literally lift it up off the ground. and we have to think of our cities very d
've been through this. we got banged up very badly a year ago with irene much worse than other states. six weeks later we had a winter storm that wiped us out. we had 1.1 million people in our little -- our customers in our little state without power. tonight we have over 600,000 people without power. some of our towns were affected by all three of those events and some of those towns are 97% of people without power. we're getting used to it and becoming experts at it. >> in terms of the frequency of extreme we've seen governor cuomo talking about it as planning on it to be the new normal. climate change is so politicized but if we are seeing frequent things of things that aren't supposed to happen what are you to do differently that you wouldn't have to do if you weren't facing these frequent and continuing events. >> i've been talking about climbed change since 1997. it's happened. it's alive and well in connecticut. number two, we have to raise a lot of infrastructure, that is literally lift it up off the ground and we have to think of our cities very differently than we thought about t
. if i have to look at what was done in the aftermath of irene just as an example i think people were generally pleased with -- you know, with the results and with fema. i know a lot of times they get beat up because obviously when somebody comes in the middle of a disaster, you know, there's a lot of decisions that have to be made on the spot and sometimes they don't seem to be the right ones but i think overall fema does a good job. >> bill: are they responsive when you contact them regarding particular problems in your district? >> oh, absolutely. and we're going to really need them after this storm. no question about that. the other thing i should mention, too, is that when we do a lot of the beach replenishment projects or other federal projects with the army corps i think people don't realize a lot of it is -- you know, is preventives. in other words, in a place like seabright or monmouth beach if you didn't have the sand, the hurricane's consequences would be a lot worse. >> bill: right. >> so it is also preve
rode out irene here also. i figured even if this storm was many orders of magnitude bigger, which it was, i'd only get a little flooding, and thankfully, at high tide on monday night -- 8:22 p.m., i'll always remember that exact time -- that turned out to be the case. megyn: for you they did, for others not so much. it's a very narrow island where the ocean is on one side and the bay is on the other, and i believe it's only one time in history that the two met due to storm surge or other reasons, and it happened this time with the main road that runs through long beach island looking like an ocean, and you can see some of the devastation in these pictures that resulted. describe the scene as you know it now outside. >> um, well, i can't see very much of the island. as you head down the main boulevard south from my town, you eventually -- in the southbound lane you come to a police car with its lights flashing, and they'll tell you the only people south of that point are, um, you know, crucial personnel or anyone who agrees to be escorted off the island by the police. so that's as
. the east coast of the u.s. and variety of events in the past, last year irene resell the surge on the kinetic coast and elsewhere. -- irene last year and elsewhere. >> time for one last question. >> your line is open. >> this storm already is proving to be a major flood event. i was hoping you could speak to what you will be doing in terms of immediate air emergency response and then speak to the coast guard about people having to evacuate people and what you're doing to help communities that have been flooded in the coming weeks. take a safety first. not only are we dealing with coastal flooding, but inland flooding. -- >> safety first. first thing is search and rescue. the assistance will be based upon the needs. the first question is, are they going to need housing assistance? we have already looked at the availability of housing stock, rental properties if we have the housing commission. we are anticipating what the needs are, though we will not know exactly until we see the impact. we are preparing with flight safety, immediate needs, housing, and then moving to recovery.
hurricanes will hit the northeast part of the united states. arguably, irene and sandy were not major hurricanes on the salve fir simpson scale. but if you look back at the 1950s a similar type of weather patterns produced tin major hurricanes up the eastern seaboard in a seven-year period including one, donna, gave hurricane-force winds everywhere from florida to maine. there is nothing new under the sun. you're seeing recycling what happened before except a lot of people don't know what happened before. a lot of that people say where is this coming from? basically go back and take a look at the maps. you will see where it came from. jenna: we forget quickly. tough to forget images we're seeing out of this storm. joe, nice to have you with us today. we appreciate the context very much. >> my pleasure. thank you for having me. jon: prayers for the victims it appeared survivors of superstorm sandy. pope benedict offering his condolences from the vatican expressing solidarity with all of the recovery crews. plus a new call for president obama to answer key questions about the deadly ter
. just like tropical storm irene did last year. the difference is, this is drawing in a lot of cold air from canada. it could produce up to a foot of snow in parts of west virginia, ohio, and pennsylvania. so we're talking about not only a tropical system with tons of rain and flooding and massive power outages but snow as well. the effects of this could be felt for weeks. >> okay, al roker, many thanks for that. >>> our colleagues at the weather channel are following this storm closely as well. we're going have a live report from meteorologist julie martin coming your way at the top of the hour. >>> from there to politics now, ten days to go until the election. today in his weekly address president obama's emphasizing the progress made four years after the wall street crisis. >> our businesses have added more than 5 million new jobs. the unemployment rate has fallen to the lowest level since i took office. home values are ride rising again and our assembly lines are humming once more. >> mitt romney and paul ryan are looking to gain momentum holding a rally last night in canton. >> i w
irene. the strongest winds may be 100 to 150 miles north. southern jersey, delaware, maryland, the highest winds maybe up there in connecticut and new york city. it's a big, broad storm. that's the most important thing. and if you're north of that center, we have big issues and big concerns with storm surge and coastal flooding. that will probably be the epic ending to this storm. that's probably what everyone will remember is what happens to the beaches in new jersey, possibly connecticut, rhode island and long island if the storm does come ashore down there in southern jersey. all of these little lines are possible paths. we still haven't ruled out a direct impact into areas of new england either. there's still some questions to be answered. the bottom line is starting on sunday afternoon and evening, mid-atlantic and northeast, it's too late to prepare. you have today, you have tomorrow and then be prepared to stay in your house with your family and kids. most of monday and maybe even into tuesday. i'll have updates throughout the show here. stay tuned. new york city, sunri
million more than we had in irene. >> wow. >> so it is -- it is a completely devastating storm from that perspective. and i think what we're going to find, unfortunately, when we get to the jersey shore today is just total devastation. >> yeah. >> and that's the real concern. because not only is it people's homes and private property, but also you have the tourism industry in new jersey which is one of our biggest industries. we're going to have to work hard to make sure we're ready for next summer at the jersey shore. >> governor chris christie, our prayers are with the state of new jersey this morning. thank you very much. >> thank you, governor, good luck. >> mika, joe, mike, willie, thank you all you guys, appreciate it. >>> coming up in minutes, author of the best-selling book "the perfect storm" and "war," we'll be right back. ♪ ♪ [ multiple sounds making melodic tune ] ♪ [ male announcer ] at northrop grumman, every innovation, every solution, comes together for a single purpose -- to make the world a safer place. that's the value of performance. northrop grumman. on ga
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)